#UMDSolidarity

A Message from the Office of Diversity & Inclusion

Dear students, staff, faculty, and administrators, and alums,

The University of Maryland community must be even more committed to our mission of building a supportive, respectful and inclusive environment. Words aren’t enough. We have to act! We must learn to be anti-racist in the face of racism whenever and wherever it occurs. Our system is broken as evidenced by disparities in education, criminal justice, income levels, housing, and health. We are all part of this broken system. It is our human responsibility to co-create a new system that is more responsive to inequities. It is difficult, yet pivotal, to consistently recognize, interrogate and disrupt ourselves in all of this. For many of us, our human tendency is to grieve every time a Black or Brown person is killed, to affirm enlightening media posts from friends, to engage in deep conversations, and then to return to our lives. And so that cycle continues. We have to do something different to disrupt the cycle.

Please join us for these events and stay tuned on our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for updates on other events and opportunities for solidarity and reflection. If your department or organization is planning a program to promote solidarity and/or reflection, please let us know at DiverseTerps@umd.edu.

#UMDSolidarity Events

Monday:Discussion

Date: September 21 Time: 12 pm to 1 pm ET Location: Lessons from a hot spring: Authentic transformation in the higher education classroom

Lessons from a hot spring: Authentic transformation in the higher education classroom

Moments of national reckoning are impactful only so much as our willingness to interpret and act on their lessons. In this discussion from the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER), we will revisit the moments of spring 2020 through the lens of racial justice and reimagine our responsibilities as educators shaping students for critical consciousness of their current and future world. Featuring Bryan Dewsbury, PhD (University of Rhode Island).


Monday:Conversation

Date: September 21 Time: 12 pm to 1:15 pm ET Location: A Discussion on the First United States Commission on Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation

A Discussion on the First United States Commission on Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation

This event is the launch of The African American Studies Department yearlong series of virtual conversations on the historical, social and psychological, economic, and political consequences and implications of racial slavery, injustice, and structural inequality in America. RSVP for the Discussion on the First United States Commission on Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation.


Wednesday:Book talk

Date: September 23 Time: 2:30 pm to 4 pm ET Location: Naming a Transnational Black Feminist Framework

Naming a Transnational Black Feminist Framework

Join the Office of Research at the School of International Service at American University as the Ethnographies of Empire Research Cluster, the Antiracist Policy Research Center, and the SIS PhD Program welcome SIS Ph.D. alumna Dr. Melchor Quick Hall to discuss her new book, "Naming a Transnational Black Feminist Framework.”


Thursday:Discussion

Date: September 24 Time: 6 pm to 7 pm ET Location: Disaster and Health: A Discussion about Race, Gender, and Social Justice

Disaster and Health: A Discussion about Race, Gender, and Social Justice

Join Dr. Jonathan Metzl and Professor Melissa Harris-Perry for a discussion on disaster, health, race, gender, and social justice. RSVP for Disaster and Health: A Discussion about Race, Gender, and Social Justice.


Wednesday:Webinar

Date: September 30 Time: 12 pm to 1 pm ET Location: Africana/Black Studies Colloquium Webinar

Africana/Black Studies Colloquium Webinar

ARHU’s Center for Literary and Comparative Studies’ Antiracism Series is honored to host the Africana/Black Studies Colloquium's inaugural webinar, “African American Studies Now,” a public conversation about the place of African American Studies at UMD English and in the world today featuring departmental faculty members Julius Fleming, Chad Infante, Rion Scott, Cecilia Shelton, Marisa Parham, and Mary Helen Washington (moderator). RSVP for the Africana/Black Studies Colloquium Webinar.


Wednesday:Workshop

Date: September 30 Time: 5 pm to 6 pm ET Location: Let’s Talk About It: Understanding Race and Culture Through Portraiture and Writing

Let’s Talk About It: Understanding Race and Culture Through Portraiture and Writing

Please join the National Portrait Gallery and DC-based writer Willona Sloan as we engage in creative writing exercises designed to encourage meaningful dialogue around topics that include race and cultural identity. Through guided looking of works of portraiture from the collection of the Portrait Gallery we will write to celebrate and affirm diverse perspectives and identities with the goal of fostering community across cultures. This program is intended for writers of all levels who are 18+.


Thursday:Author talk

Date: October 1 Time: 5:30 pm to 6:45 pm ET Location: Black in Place: The Spatial Aesthetics of Race in a Post-Chocolate City with Brandi Thompson Summers

Black in Place: The Spatial Aesthetics of Race in a Post-Chocolate City with Brandi Thompson Summers

Join for a conversation with Brandi Thompson Summers, professor of Geography and Global Metropolitan Studies at U.C.-Berkeley and author of "Black in Place: The Spatial Aesthetics of Race in a Post-Chocolate City" in conversation with Samir Meghelli, senior curator at the Anacostia Community Museum. Summers will discuss her book and the political and economic dynamics by which race and space are re-imagined and reordered, including along the H Street NE Corridor here in Washington, DC. This event is part of an ongoing "A Right to the City" Author Talk series with American University’s Metropolitan Policy Center and the DC Public Library.


Racial Equity and Housing Justice During and After COVID-19” A Live Conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coates and the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC)

Join Ta-Nehisi Coates of NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute and NLIHC for a conversation on “Racial Equity and Housing Justice during and after COVID-19” on October 6, at 1 pm ET. Be sure to submit questions for Ta-Nehisi through the registration page or via social media using #RacialEquityandCOVID.


Tuesday:Colloquium

Date: October 6 Time: 9 am to 10 am ET Location: ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Marisa Parham

ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Marisa Parham

This colloquium from the ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice features Marisa Parham, professor of English and director for the African American Digital Humanities initiative (AADHUM), who will discuss African American texts and technologies in her talk, “Purpose, Frivolity, Futures: What, really, is inclusion?”


Thursday:Discussion

Date: October 8 Time: 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm ET Location: Considering racial microaggressions in science

Considering racial microaggressions in science

Join the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) for an interactive session to explore ways in which racial microaggressions manifest themselves in science. We will discuss what microaggressions are and how they effect underrepresented individuals in an academic setting. We will present several examples of microaggressions and discuss general strategies for confronting them. Participants will brainstorm ideas for ways in which they would approach different microaggression scenarios followed by group discussion Featuring Colin Harrison, PhD (Georgia Tech) and Kimberly Tanner, PhD (San Francisco State University).


Monday:Conversation

Date: October 12 Time: 12 pm to 1 pm ET Location: Race Beyond Representation

Race Beyond Representation

Professor Christine Goding-Doty (Hobart and William Smith Colleges) with Professor Ting-Hui Hu (University of Michigan). Registration opens two weeks in advance to the event.


But is it really “just” science? Engaging critical race theory to unpack racial oppression with implications for Black student science engagement

Disseminated through the culture of science (i.e., norms, values, beliefs, and practices), is the underlying message that there is but one “universal truth” regarding what is or what counts as scientific knowledge, research, and general practice. This culture and subsequent message have implications for who is recognized as being a scientist, or a validated member of the scientific community, and the process by which one gains such recognition. In noting the distinct, racialized experiences of Black students in science, this seminar from the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) introduces Critical Race Theory as a framework for attending to the prevalence, permeance, and impact of structural racism embedded within and manifesting through the culture of science, while also detailing the implications of structural racism in and through science on Black student science engagement. Featuring Terrell Morton, PhD (University of Missouri).


Thursday:Conversation

Date: October 22 Time: 12 pm to 1 pm ET Location: Fictions of Black Childhood

Fictions of Black Childhood

Dr. Nicole King (Goldsmiths, University of London) in conversation with Professor Kandice Chuh (CUNY/The Graduate Center) to discuss King’s current book project, African American Narratives of Childhood and Racial Subjectivity. Q&A moderated by Tita Chico and William A. Cohen. Registration opens two weeks in advance to the event.


Monday:Colloquium

Date: October 26 Time: 9 am to 10 am ET Location: ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Scot Reese

ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Scot Reese

This colloquium from the ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice features Scot Reese, professor in the School of Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies, who will discuss Racial “Battle Fatigue” in black theatre and culture.


Wednesday:Discussion

Date: October 28 Time: 1 pm to 2 pm ET Location: Why Black Lives Matter in the Humanities

Why Black Lives Matter in the Humanities

Professor Felice Blake (University of California, Santa Barbara) to discuss with Professor Alison Reed (Old Dominion University) Blake’s essays “Why Black Lives Matter in the Humanities” and “How Does Cultural Criticism ‘Work’ in the Age of Antiracist Incorporation,” as well as their co-edited (with Paula Ionaide), Antiracism Inc.:Why the Way We Talk about Racial Justice Matters. Co-sponsored with the Honors College Honors Humanities Program, University Libraries, the Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion and The Graduate School. Registration opens two weeks in advance of the event.


You Can’t Stop the Revolution: Community Disorder and Social Ties in Post-Ferguson America with Andrea S. Boyles

Join the Anacostia Community Museum for a discussion with Andrea S. Boyles, sociologist and author of "You Can’t Stop the Revolution: Community Disorder and Social Ties in Post-Ferguson America." In conversation with Derek Hyra, associate professor and Founding Director of the Metropolitan Policy Center at American University, Boyles will discuss her book which offers a view from inside the Ferguson protests as the Black Lives Matter movement catapulted onto the global stage and serves as a reminder that community empowerment is still possible in neighborhoods experiencing police brutality and interpersonal violence. This event is part of an ongoing "A Right to the City" Author Talk series with American University’s Metropolitan Policy Center and the DC Public Library.


Thursday:Colloquium

Date: November 5 Time: 9 am to 10 am ET Location: ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Julius Fleming, Jr.

ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Julius Fleming, Jr.

This colloquium from the ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice features Julius Fleming, Jr., assistant professor in English, who will discuss his book, “Black Patience: Performance, Civil Rights, and the Refusal to Wait for Freedom.”


Combating Racism: Betsy Graves Reyneau, Laura Wheeler Waring, and Representation of Black Achievement

In the 1943, the Harmon Foundation commissioned artists Betsy Graves Reyneau and Laura Wheeler Waring to make portraits of eminent Black Americans capable of highlighting Black achievement and fighting white prejudice.These 42 paintings were first shown at the Smithsonian in 1944. This discussion will revisit this exhibition, exploring the intersection of gender, philanthropy, Black history, and African American art during and just after World War II to show the exhibition’s complex formation. It will also seek to understand the work within the broader context of Americanness during the Second World War.


Wednesday:Conversation

Date: November 11 Time: 5 pm to 6 pm ET Location: African American Language, Black Women, & the Teaching of Writing

African American Language, Black Women, & the Teaching of Writing

Dr. Brittany Hull (Indiana University of Pennsylvania) in conversation with Professor Temptaous Mckoy (Bowie State University) about Hull’s scholarship on the use of African American Language by Black women who are teaching writing. Co-sponsored by the University Libraries, Petrou Lecture Series, The Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion and The Graduate School. Registration opens two weeks in advance to the event.


Monday:Roundtable

Date: November 16 Time: 2 pm to 3:30 pm ET Location: Centering Black Stories in Archives

Centering Black Stories in Archives

African American history is American history, and the Black experience, from the local community level to the African Diaspora, belongs at the center. Examining the experiences of Black people, their literature, and the many other methods of cultural expression, archivists and scholars are exploring new techniques to collect, document, and understand their stories. Some narratives are embedded in the archive, but hidden, while others remain outside the archive. Whether generated in the digital humanities or the history of local communities, records of these experiences need to be gathered, cataloged, archived, and shared for now and the future. Roundtable participants are pioneering new ways of documenting the African American experience and giving it its rightful place in the archive. The presenters’ perspectives are at the core of teaching anti-racist ideologies and shedding light on anti-Black racist practices. Please join us for an exploration of history and archiving practices that matter. Registration opens two weeks in advance to the event.

Panelists:

Aleia Brown, Assistant Director African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities (AADHum) Initiative, University of Maryland

Joni Floyd, Curator, Maryland & Historical Collections, University of Maryland

Lae’l Hughes-Watkins, University Archivist, University of Maryland

Zita Nunes, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of Maryland

The Q&A will be moderated by Doug McElrath Director, Special Collections & University Archives, and Tahirah Akbar-Williams, Education and African American Studies Librarian.


Tuesday:Colloquium

Date: November 17 Time: 9 am to 10 am ET Location: ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Tamanika Ferguson

ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Tamanika Ferguson

This colloquium from the ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice features Tamanika Ferguson, a presidential postdoc in the Communication Department at Maryland, who will discuss incarcerated women and media activism.


Thursday:Seminar

Date: November 19 Time: 3 pm to 4 pm ET Location: Black women and belongingness: An interrogation of STEM education as a white, patriarchal space

Black women and belongingness: An interrogation of STEM education as a white, patriarchal space

This interactive research presentation from the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) engages audience members with empirical data to deconstruct ideas of Black women’s belongingness in STEM education as a white, patriarchal space. Statistics from recent National Science Foundation reports of advanced degrees in mathematical sciences are used along with Black women’s narratives of experience in STEM majors as well as perceptions of instruction in introductory courses. Please come prepared for an engaging discourse and critical reflection to inform more equitable, socially conscious practices in STEM education. Featuring Luis Leyva, PhD and Nicole Joseph, PhD (Vanderbilt University).


Tuesday:Seminar

Date: December 1 to December 2 Time: 3 pm to 4 pm ET Location: An exploratory investigation of the experiences of Black immigrant women in undergraduate STEM

An exploratory investigation of the experiences of Black immigrant women in undergraduate STEM

The research presented in this seminar from the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) investigates the politicized, racialized, and gendered dimensions of the presumably “objective” disciplines of STEM. This work uses critical discourse analysis and case studies to better understand how Black immigrant women use their cultural epistemologies to attain undergraduate degrees in engineering. The research presented will use a qualitative approach, involving 40 interviews with undergraduate engineering students of a large public university in the southwestern United States. Featuring Meseret Hailu, PhD and Brooke Coley, PhD (Arizona State University).


Tuesday:Colloquium

Date: December 8 Time: 9 am to 10 am ET Location: ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Richard Bell

ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice, Featuring Richard Bell

This colloquium from the ARHU Dean’s Colloquium Series on Race, Equity and Justice features Richard Bell, professor of History, who will discuss African American political culture and his book: “Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home.”

Stay tuned for the rest of the #UMDSolidarity week events on ODI's Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

It's time to act. Join us.